Medicare Costs

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2019 Original Medicare Costs at a Glance


Listed below are basic costs for people with Medicare Plans

2019 costs at a glance
Part A premium Most people don’t pay a monthly premium for Part A (sometimes called “premium-free Part A”). Although if you buy Part A, you’ll pay up to $437 each month.
Part A hospital inpatient deductible and coinsurance  You pay:

  • $1,364 deductible for each benefit period
  • Days 1-60: $0 coinsurance for each benefit period
  • 61-90: $341 coinsurance per day of each benefit period
  • 91 and beyond: $682 coinsurance per each “lifetime reserve day” after day 90 for each benefit period (up to 60 days over your lifetime)
  • Beyond lifetime reserve days: all costs
Part B premium Most people pay $135.50 each month.
Part B deductible and coinsurance $185 per year. After your deductible is met, you typically pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount for most doctor services (including most doctor services while you’re a hospital inpatient), outpatient therapy, and durable medical equipment.
Part C premium The Part C monthly premium varies by plan. Compare costs for specific Part C plans.
Part D premium Then, Part D monthly premium varies by plan (higher-income consumers may pay more). Compare costs for specific Part D plans.

Detailed Medicare Plans Cost Information

Medicare Part A Costs for 2019

If you buy Part A, you’ll pay up to $437 each month, most people get premium-free Part A. However, those that don’t enroll when first eligible, the monthly premium may go up 10%. You’ll have to pay the higher premium for twice the number of years you could have had Part A, but didn’t sign up.

Part A costs with only Original Medicare can be overwhelming if you don’t understand how much your responsibility entails. Additionally, Part A is hospital insurance or coverage for inpatient services.

The Part A deductible is $1,364 per benefit period. So, you can pay this deductible several times during the year. After the deductible, 20% of inpatient services become the beneficiaries responsibility. Also, copayments can be a requirement for some services under Part A.

Part B Costs for 2019

In 2019, most people pay the standard Part B premium of $135.50 each month. However, if your modified adjusted gross income as reported on your IRS tax return from 2 years ago is above a certain amount, you may pay more. You can read more about the 2019 IRMAA Part B increases here.

The standard Part B premium can cost more to those with a higher income. However, those who were protected by the “hold harmless” provision paid a lower premium for their Part B.

However, there was a Social Security COLA increase for 2019. Thus, forcing those paying less than the standard premium to pay the full amount of $135.50.

You’ll pay a different premium if:

  • You enroll in Part B for the first time
  • You don’t get Social Security benefits.
  • You’re directly billed for your Part B premiums.
  • You have Original Medicare and Medicaid, and Medicaid pays your premiums. (Your state pays the standard premium amount)
  • Your modified adjusted gross income as reported on your IRS tax return from 2 years ago is above a certain amount.

If you’re in 1 of these 5 groups, here’s what you’ll pay:

Late enrollment penalty:

First, if you don’t sign up for Part B when first eligible, you pay a late enrollment penalty for as long as you have Part B. Your monthly premium for Part B may go up 10% for each full 12-month period that you could have had Part B, but didn’t.

Also, you may have to wait until the General Enrollment Period (from January 1 to March 31) to enroll in Part B, and coverage starts July 1 of that year.

Part B costs

You pay $185 per year for your Part B deductible. After your deductible is met, you typically pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount for most doctor services (including most doctor services while you’re a hospital inpatient), outpatient therapy, and durable medical equipment.

You generally pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount for the doctor or other health care provider’s services, and the Part B deductible applies. For all other services, you also generally pay a copayment for each service you get in an outpatient hospital setting.

You may pay more for services you get in a hospital outpatient setting than you would pay for the same care in a doctor’s office. For some screenings and preventive services, coinsurance, copayments, and the Part B deductible don’t apply, so you pay nothing.


Medicare Part C (Medicare Advantage) Costs

The Part C monthly premium varies by plan. Medicare Advantage (MA) plan costs are similar to employer policies; HMO, PPO, and other similar options are available with MA coverage.

MA plans must cover at least as good as Medicare. So, most of the Part C plans offer benefits beyond Standard Medicare.

The amount you spend on Part C depends entirely on which policy you choose to enroll in for the year. Also, each year these plans change annually, requiring plan review frequently.

Deductibles, copayments, & coinsurance:

The amount you pay for Part C deductibles, copayments, and/or coinsurance varies by plan. However, while the costs vary, all Part C plans have a maximum out of pocket, copayments, and coinsurances.

Some policies have a deductible. Working with an agent can make it easier to decide which policy is the most suitable.


Medicare Part D (Medicare Plans Prescription Drug Coverage)

Medicare Part D monthly premium costs vary by the plan; also, higher-income consumers may pay more. Your estimated prescription drug plan monthly premium based on your income as reported on your IRS tax return from 2 years ago and last year.

If your income is above a certain limit, you’ll pay an income-related monthly adjustment amount in addition to your plan premium. Additionally, you can read more about the 2019 Medicare Prescription Drug Plan Changes here.

Late enrollment penalty:

You may owe a late enrollment penalty if you go without creditable prescription drug coverage for any continuous period of 63 days or more after the Initial Enrollment Period is over. Although, Medicare costs are very personal; they depend on many factors such as location and eligibility.

In general, you’ll have to pay this penalty for as long as you have Medicare plans. Also, the late enrollment penalty depends on how long you went without Part D.

Deductibles, copayments, & coinsurance:

The amount you pay for Part D deductibles, copayments, and/or coinsurance varies by plan. Look for specific Medicare plans drug costs, and then call our Medicare agents and we can explain the plans of interest.

To get coverage in the gaps of Medicare enroll in a Medigap policy today. Call an agent or fill out an online rate form to find the best policy.